Math 111 - Fall 2022

This is the official website of Section 3 of Calculus 1 taught by Santiago Arango-Piñeros in the fall of 2022, at Emory University.

Lecture Room MSC N304
Lecture Time Tuesdays and Thursdays (8:30-9:45)
Office MSC W431
Email santiago.arango@emory.edu
Office Hours Mondays (15:00-16:50), Thursdays (15:00-15:50) on Zoom, or by appointment.
Text Stewart, James. Single Variable Calculus: Early Transcendentals. 8e.
ISBN 978-1-305-27033-6
Final Exam December 14, from 6:30 to 9 PM.

Solutions to exams

About this course

In this course everybody counts:

  1. Mathematical potential is distributed equally among different groups, irrespective of geographic, demographic, and economic boundaries.
  2. Everyone can have joyful, meaningful, and empowering mathematical experiences.
  3. Mathematics is a powerful, malleable tool that can be shaped and used differently by various communities to serve their needs.
  4. Every student deserves to be treated with dignity and respect.

Some advice

  • The recipe for succes in this class is simple to state and hard to accomplish: try all the recommended problems and make sure you understand them. If you do this, I can guarantee you will get an A.
  • Talk to your classmates! Math is more fun when we share our understanding and confusions. No need to suffer in silence.
  • Paraphrasing Galileo: "You can not teach a person anything, you can only help them find it within themselves." In particular, math can't be learned by just sitting in the lectures; you need to engage with the material and understand things in your own way.
  • Organize your schedule. Dedicate 1-2 hours each day during the week (rest on weekends) to work on the problems. Before the exams, write down a brief summary of the main concepts and make sure to review your solutions of the corresponding problems.

Syllabus

Schedule

  • Follow this link for a PDF document with the class schedule.

In-class problems and lecture notes

Lecture Date In class problems
1 August 26 2.1: 1, 3. 2.2: 1, 4, 6.
2 August 30 2.3: 2, 11, 13, 21.
3 September 1 2.5: 1, 2, 10, 20, 26, 36. 2.6: 2, 3, 10, 19, 37.
4 September 6 2.7: 1, 2, 3, 5, 31.
5 September 8 2.8: 1, 4, 5, 6.
6 September 13 3.1: 8, 14, 18, 19. 3.2: 12, 13, 22, 28,
7 September 15 3.10: 3, 13, 23, 26, 28.
8 September 20 4.1: 2, 3, 5, 6, 48, 61. 4.3: 16, 20.
9 September 27 4.7: 1, 2, 3, 4.
10 September 29 3.3: 1, 6, 8, 40.
11 October 4 3.4: 1, 8, 10, 18, 44.
12 October 6 3.5: 1, 2, 4, 11.
13 October 13 3.6: 2, 4, 7, 8.
14 October 18 3.9: 1, 14.
15 October 25 4.4: 1, 16, 49, 56, 58.
16 October 27 4.2: 2, 3, 5. 4.5: 1, 30.
17 November 1 4.8: 1, 2, 3, 22, 62. 4.7: 1, 29.
18 November 3 5.1: 2, 4, 7.
19 November 8 5.2: 1, 2, 6, 37.
20 November 10 5.3: 1, 6, 7, 40, 61.
21 November 15 5.5: 1, 6, 13, 44, 54, 60.
22 November 22 6.1: 1, 2, 6, 12.
23 November 29 6.2: 2, 4, 5.
24 December 1 6.3: 2, 5, 45.
25 December 6 Closing topics.

Recommended problems

Here are some additional recommended problems from the book. You don't have to do them all to get an A, but if you understand them all you will definitely get an A. If you want more challenging problems, let me know and I will hook you up with some fun stuff.

Section Problems
2.1 1, 2, 5, 7.
2.2 4-9, 31-43.
2.3 1-9, 11-32, 48-50.
2.5 11-14, 17-32, 41-43, 53-56.
2.6 3, 4, 15-42.
2.7 3, 5-8, 13, 15, 17, 20-22, 31-44, 59, 60.
2.8 3-11, 21-31, 47-54.
3.1 3-38.
3.2 3-32.
3.3 1-16, 21-24, 39-50.
3.4 1-54.
3.5 1-20, 25-32, 35-40, 49-60.
3.6 2-34, 39-50.
3.7 1-4, 7-10, 31, 32
3.8 1-6, 8-11, 18-20
3.10 TBD
4.1 29-44, 47-62.
4.2 1-17, 19-22.
4.3 9-21, 37-56.
4.4 8-27, 30-68.
4.5 1-54.
4.7 2-8, 11-19, 21-23, 34-40, 48, 50.
4.9 1-18, 20-43, 45-48, 59-64.
5.1 1-8, 21-25.
5.2 17-25, 33-40, 47-50, 55-58.
5.3 5-37, 39-44, 59-63.
5.4 1-12, 14-18, 21-39, 41, 42, 43.

Resources

Here are some interesting resources to complement the course materials.

Author: Santiago Arango-Piñeros

Email: santiago.arango@emory.edu

Emacs 27.2 (Org mode 9.4.4)